Paraffin wax

Paraffin wax is a colorless, odorless solid that is extracted from oil or coal in the petrochemical industry. Paraffin wax is a combination of saturated hydrocarbon molecules consisting of 20 to 40 atomic carbons.

The raw material for the production of paraffin wax is acid wax, which is a mixture of oil and wax. This substance is a by-product obtained from the refining of lubricating oils.

The first step in making paraffin wax is to separate the liquid oil from the solid oil. Oils are separated by crystallization. The wax is usually loosened, heated, then mixed with one or more solvents such as ketone, and then cooled.

Solid wax paraffin is divided into two categories: light paraffin and heavy paraffin Wax paraffin is solid at room temperature but begins to melt at temperatures above 37 degrees. The boiling point of paraffin wax is 370 degrees Celsius (698 degrees Fahrenheit).

Paraffin wax is more refined than other paraffins and is therefore widely used in the food and cosmetics industries.

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تولید کودهای شیمیایی، صنایع نساجی، غذایی، کبریت سازی و تولید رنگ, شمع سازی، ضد آب کردن انواع کاغذ و پارچه، انواع پولیشرها، صنایع لاستیک سازی